Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4 Art ~ Maybe My Favorite Lens

[NIKON D750, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Manual, ISO 640, 1/30, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

Why would I like this lens so much? I believe it is mainly because I can do with it what I could never do with a smartphone camera–Shallow Depth-of-field.

Robin Rayne working with me during the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl 2015 Houston vs FSU [NIKON D750, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 160, 1/100, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

It is a great way to isolate a subject.

Into The Woods Test Shots of my daughter Chelle in our backyard. [NIKON D4, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Manual, ISO 200, 1/640, ƒ/1.6, (35mm = 35)]

Bokeh is defined as “the effect of a soft out-of-focus background that you get when shooting a subject, using a fast lens, at the widest aperture, such as f/2.8 or wider.” Simply put, bokeh is the pleasing or aesthetic quality of out-of-focus blur in a photograph.

Nicaragua [NIKON D5, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

Most of the time I want to add context of a person in their environment. That is where shooting with your lens closed down to ƒ/5.6 or greater really gives you context because more is in focus.

Wellness Center at Chick-fil-A Support Center [NIKON D5, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 450, 1/100, ƒ/1.8, (35mm = 35)]

However, often keeping something out of focus, but yet still discernible like this of a lady working out with her trainer the shallow depth-of-field allows for some context.

This is the Macchiato I was drinking in Kosovo. [NIKON D5, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/400, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

One thing that affects your depth-of-field is how close you are to the subject. Getting really close will give you the shallowest depth-of-field. Sometimes if you get too close with some micro lenses your subject will appear out of focus because it is too shallow.

Dining Room at a Chick-fil-A of their fresh flowers on tables [NIKON D5, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 400, 1/2000, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]
I really enjoy going to Hawaii each year and stopping by Ken’s House of Pancackes [NIKON Z 6, AF 35mm f/1.4G, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 2000, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]
Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden [NIKON Z 6, AF 35mm f/1.4G, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 450, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

Here in this photo of the bud on the plant you can actually see the “Circle of Confusion”.

In optics, a circle of confusion is an optical spot caused by a cone of light rays from a lens not coming to a perfect focus when imaging a point source. It is also known as disk of confusion, circle of indistinctness, blur circle, or blur spot.

Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden [NIKON Z 6, AF 35mm f/1.4G, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 450, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

I just love my Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4 and love it even more on the Nikon Z6 mirrorless camera. What a great combination.

Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden, Orchids [NIKON Z 6, AF 35mm f/1.4G, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 900, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]
Team member portrait in back of Chick-fil-A restaurant [NIKON Z 6, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 2200, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

When shooting in a restaurant kitchen you don’t want to always show the working kitchen, but I still wanted to feature the team members. Shooting at ƒ/1.4 and getting close to the model helped me achieve a feel of the kitchen and keeping details from being seen.

Team member portrait [NIKON Z 6, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 720, 1/500, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]
Labor Costs [NIKON Z 6, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Manual, ISO 50, 1/125, ƒ/2.5, (35mm = 35)]
Zahara Ahmed – Senior Photo [NIKON Z 6, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/1250, ƒ/3.5, (35mm = 35)]