Civil Twilight

At the beginning of civil twilight, just after sunset, the colors of the sky change most rapidly. Clouds in the west are illuminated by orange-red sunlight, while the ones in the east remain in blue and indigo. Generally speaking, civil twilight lasts for about 20 to 30 minutes, depending on the season and latitude.

While Civil Twilight is technically 20 to 30 minutes the best possible moment to get that perfect balance of the city lights with the night sky is more of a “Twinkling of the Eye.”

52 in a flash, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed.

1 Corinthians 15:52
Seattle Skyline

As you can see that all the way back to even biblical times people understood that some of those things we see are like a shooting star and happen so briefly that if you are not paying attention they will disappear.

Considered to be an icon of the city and the Pacific Northwest, it has been designated a Seattle landmark. Located in the Lower Queen Anne neighborhood, it was built in the Seattle Center for the 1962 World’s Fair, which drew over 2.3 million visitors. [NIKON D4, 70.0-200.0 mm f/2.8, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/6, ƒ/8, (35mm = 95)]

I believe that the Civil Twilight is the best time to photograph architecture. The second best time is “Civil Dawn” which happens at Sunrise.

The Gateway Arch is a 630-foot monument in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Clad in stainless steel and built in the form of a weighted catenary arch, it is the world’s tallest arch, the tallest man-made monument in the Western Hemisphere, and Missouri’s tallest accessible building.  [NIKON D750, 28.0-300.0 mm f/3.5-5.6, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 20, ƒ/16, (35mm = 40)]

What you quickly realize is that during these few minutes of Civil Twilight is that the light values that are man made come into the same exposure range as the sky. Anything doesn’t have light on it will slowly go to a silouette.

Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People is a cable-stayed bridge across the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, United States. It was designed by TriMet, the Portland metropolitan area’s regional transit authority, for its MAX Orange Line light rail passenger trains. [NIKON D750, Sigma 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 13, ƒ/8, (35mm = 35)]

To get the best photos of Civil Twilight really requires a tripod. The best photos are normally taken with the lowest ISO. This makes your exposure time for the shutter speed to take seconds and not fraction of seconds as you can during daylight.

Pier at Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina during Civil Twilight [NIKON Z 6, Sigma 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 30, ƒ/11, (35mm = 105)]

When you use these longer exposure times of like 30 seconds as I did in photographing the Pier at Ocean Isle Beach the water turns into a foam.

Pier at Night Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina. Leary Family Vacation [NIKON Z 6, Sigma 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 30, ƒ/8, (35mm = 52)]Pier at Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina. [NIKON Z 6, 24.0-105.0 mm f/4.0, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 30, ƒ/8, (35mm = 52)]

What happens as the light from the sky becomes darker the light fixtures are no longer distinguishable, you just see the light emitting from the fixture.

Fireworks 4th of July Ocean Isle Beach, NC [NIKON D4, 14.0-24.0 mm f/2.8, Mode = Manual, ISO 200, 30, ƒ/8, (35mm = 14)]

Now the other popular thing to photograph is fireworks, but these always happen after Civil Twilight. They want the fireworks to standout in the night sky.

4th of July Fireworks at Roswell High School [NIKON Z 6, 24.0-105.0 mm f/4.0, Mode = Manual, ISO 100, 4, ƒ/11, (35mm = 24)]

Most everything becomes at best a silhouette and difficult to make out what is on the ground.

4th of July Fireworks at Roswell High School [NIKON Z 6, 24.0-105.0 mm f/4.0, Mode = Manual, ISO 100, 4, ƒ/11, (35mm = 24)]

I worked on this photo in Lightroom to open up the shadows to reveal some of the night time sky, but it introduces a lot of noise in the process.

Portland Skyline [NIKON D750, , Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 8, ƒ/8, (35mm = 24)]

Tips for Twilight Photography

  • Sunrise or Sunset ~ Before even thinking of going try and determine if this is better as a photo. Do I want some of the sun as it sets shining on the front or back? Some locations the sun will be to the side and not in front or back.
  • Pack Tripod & Bug Spray ~ My friend Morris Abernathy and I went one evening to capture the Fort Worth Skyline and the best location was where we were eaten up by mosquitos. You need a sturdy tripod for the camera and lens you plan to use.
  • Arrive Early ~ Civil dawn is the moment when the geometric center of the Sun is 6 degrees below the horizon in the morning and Civil dusk is the moment when the geometrical center of the Sun is 6 degrees below the horizon in the evening. That is the 20 minutes after sunset and 20 minutes before sunset. So whatever the time is for Sunrise or Sunset you need to be in place with your tripod and camera setup at least 15 to 30 minutes prior.
  • Stay Late ~ I recommend planning for about 45 minutes past the time of Sunrise or Sunset.
  • Take lots of photos ~ don’t just shoot those few minutes of the best light. Shoot some with the sun still up and when it is pitch black sky. Sometimes these are also great photos.
  • Second or Third Camera ~ Some locations you may want to compose differently. Rather than miss a great shot, if you have extra cameras, tripods and lenses, make use of them.
  • Cable Release or Radio Transmitter ~ To get the sharpest photos use a cable release. If you are shooting on a DSLR, locking up the mirror will help as sell. If you are using multiple cameras, using a radio transmitter can help you trigger multiple cameras at the same time.
Portland Skyline [NIKON D750, , Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 4, ƒ/8, (35mm = 35)]

There are many times that daylight will reveal things like mountains in the distant that dusk or dawn can hide.

Portland, Oregon [NIKON D4, 28.0-300.0 mm f/3.5-5.6, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/400, ƒ/8, (35mm = 200)]