Flashpoint XPlor 600 HSS TTL with Nikon Z6

Haley Newbold, team member at Chick-fil-A Roswell Corners FSU, expedites an order to customer in drive-thru. The Dining Rooms are shut down during the Coronavirus outbreak. Paul Joubert’s restaurant Roswell Corners FSU is on their third day of the dining room closed. [NIKON Z 6, 28.0-300.0 mm f/3.5-5.6, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/60, ƒ/5.3, (35mm = 98)]

I have really enjoyed working with the Flashpoint XPlor 600 HSS TTL to help with some of my tricky lighting situations.

Here you can see the two flashpoint xplor 600 hss ttl flashes I am using outside to help with the light. [NIKON Z 6, 28.0-300.0 mm f/3.5-5.6, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/500, ƒ/3.5, (35mm = 28)]

By using the transmitter to change the settings on the flashes allows me to not have to stop shooting where I am standing and go and adjust each flash and then do more test shots. I can shoot and make the adjustments on the fly as they say.

The strobes allow me to keep the background, which is about 5 stops brighter than the subject not blown away. [NIKON Z 6, 35.0 mm f/1.4, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/400, ƒ/1.4, (35mm = 35)]

The canopy had a white ceiling that I bounced off of to get an even light to shoot these photos you see here.

[NIKON Z 6, 14.0-24.0 mm f/2.8, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/80, ƒ/2.8, (35mm = 15)]

Behind the guys head is one of the lights. The other is near the passenger door of this SUV bouncing as well.

[NIKON Z 6, 28.0-300.0 mm f/3.5-5.6, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/60, ƒ/4.5, (35mm = 48)]

On the other side of the building was the window to the restaurant for delivering food. I didn’t have the same size canopy and used more direct flash that did catch a small overhang to bounce down as well.

[NIKON Z 6, 85.0 mm f/1.8, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/2000, ƒ/1.8, (35mm = 85)]

At another drive-thru at a different restaurant they didn’t have the canopy. I just had my assistant man the off camera flash and stay about 45º from the camera angle. That usually meant I was on one side of the car shooting and the flash was on the other side.

[NIKON Z 6, 85.0 mm f/1.8, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/400, ƒ/1.8, (35mm = 85)]

I was shooting wide open at ƒ/1.4 with my 35mm and ƒ/1.8 with my 85mm. Since the flash is TTL it also is HSS. That stands for High Speed Sync.

I shot most all the photos on the overcast day with the strobes at shutter speeds of 1/400 up to 1/2000 with the flash.

Using Nikon’s software I can see how the camera was focusing. It was on eye-tracking. Here I zoomed in so you can see the focus point.

I love shooting at ƒ/1.4, but few images were as sharp as they are now with the Nikon Z6 mirrorless that has eye-tracking.

[NIKON Z 6, 85.0 mm f/1.8, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/800, ƒ/1.8, (35mm = 85)]

While shooting with the Nikon 85mm ƒ/1.8 lets me blur the background which helps you make the subject pop. Using the flash helps get a catchlight in the eyes on an overcast day. It also helps increasing the dynamic range.

TIPS:

  • Use fill-flash
  • Use wide aperture like ƒ/1.4 or ƒ/1.8
  • Use eye-tracking to get that precise focus on the eyes
  • Use Dehaze Slider in Lightroom – Helps bring back detail in hazy BOKEH
[NIKON Z 6, 85.0 mm f/1.8, Mode = Aperture Priority, ISO 100, 1/500, ƒ/1.8, (35mm = 85)]