Mother nature continues to destroy lives on Hawaii

Paradise Helicopter Tour
Kīlauea is a currently active shield volcano in the Hawaiian Islands, and the most active of the five volcanoes that together form the island of Hawaiʻi. Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. Lava levels in the upper channel between Fissure 8 and Pohoiki Rd. are low this morning but are expected to rise after the next collapse/explosive vent at Kīlauea summit. The channelized ʻaʻā flow west of Kapoho Crater continues to be the main ocean entry at the southern edge of the flow front this morning. Despite no visible surface connection to the Fissure 8 channel, lava continues to ooze out at several points on the 6 km (3.7 mi) wide flow front into the ocean. [Nikon D5, 28-300mm ƒ/3.5-5.6, ISO 1250, ƒ/8, 1/2000]
The massive destruction of the Kilauea volcano over the past few months hasn’t been what we expect from Mother nature.

We don’t expect our homes to be destroyed with no hope of rebuilding.

[Nikon D5, 28-300mm ƒ/3.5-5.6, ISO 1800, ƒ/8, 1/2000]
In this photo you can see the home in the path of the destruction. This looks more like a scene from the 1958 science-fiction-horror film The Blob.

While I was enjoying my tourist helicopter ride to see the power of the volcano I wasn’t thinking about the lives being destroyed by nature.

[Nikon D5, 28-300mm ƒ/3.5-5.6, ISO 400, ƒ/8, 1/2000]
I was in the sky with other tourists on numerous helicopters flying over the volcano being entertained.

The University of Nations in Kona, Hawaii. [Fuji X-E3, 10-24mm ƒ/4, ISO 250, ƒ/16, 1/100]
The reason I was in Hawaii was to teach photography at The University of Nations which is part of Youth with a Mission. The campus is now in the process of seeing how they can help some of the families displaced by the volcano.

I was listening to the founder Loren Cunningham as he talked about the plight of the those who have lost their homes to the volcano.

I had been teaching on storytelling and knew that when you tell a good story it actually affects the audiences physical body.

In a good chase scene you can feel your heart racing. When the main character is hiding and close to being found you may have your palms sweating.

The same gut wrenching feeling I get when bills are coming due and the cash flow is getting tight is how I felt when Loren Cunningham pointed out that these people had not just lost a home, but were having to still pay on their mortgages. They were now paying for something that they couldn’t rebuild on or resell.

This is a different kind of natural disaster than fires, tornados or hurricanes I have experienced in the past. Those disasters volunteers organized to help clean up and rebuild the destructed areas. They helped to restore people’s lives.

The closest disaster that has some similarities was Katrina where many could not go back and rebuild.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. Lava levels in the upper channel between Fissure 8 and Pohoiki Rd. are low this morning but are expected to rise after the next collapse/explosive vent at Kīlauea summit. [Nikon D5, 28-300mm ƒ/3.5-5.6, ISO 800, ƒ/8, 1/2000]
As you watch the updates on the volcano, please keep in mind all those who have lost their homes and are now in financial crisis.

The lava striking the sea is gorgeous — and can be deadly
     Lava spilling off the southeastern edge of the island of Hawaii is producing a noxious haze where it hits the seawater. Made out of hydrochloric acid, steam, and shards of volcanic glass, the gas is hazardous to anyone who breathes it.
     Laze forms when lava reaching temperatures of around 2,100 degrees Fahrenheit strikes seawater. The heat boils seawater dry — not just boiling away the water, but also heating salt molecules the boiled water leaves behind, like magnesium chloride. “The magnesium chloride is pretty reactive,” says volcanologist Simon Carn at Michigan Technological University. “It reacts with the water — the steam in the air.” That makes hydrochloric acid, which probably sounds familiar because it’s the acid in your stomach that melts the food you eat into a soupy pulp. That stuff isn’t good to get in your lungs.
[Nikon D5, 28-300mm ƒ/3.5-5.6, ISO 1000, ƒ/8, 1/2000]

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