Use different lenses to get variety of looks for a client

[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 900, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
What lenses do you take on a job? For me I might take all I can but a better question might be which ones do you try to use the most.

One lens I love to use a lot these past couple of years is the Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4 Art lens. It is so sharp.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 750, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
I love to fill the frame get pretty close to people and let that background go out of focus giving that smooth BOKEH. Bokeh has been defined as “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light”.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 450, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
The cool thing beyond the BOKEH is shooting a much lower ISO than you have to do with say ƒ/4 or ƒ/5.6.

The shallow depth-of-field makes the subject just pop out of the photo.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 500, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
The closer you get to the subject the even shallower depth-of-field becomes with the lens.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 450, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 125, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
The other cool thing I love about giving clients photos with this lens is you cannot get this look with your iPhone.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 640, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
[Nikon D5, Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4, ISO 400, ƒ/1.4, 1/100]
While I love this lens I often am having to just react to a moment. I need to have more than a 35mm lens. I love a good zoom and when it comes to photographing people I love the Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4 Art lens.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 45600, ƒ/13, 1/100]
Sometimes I need to be really wide like in this photo of the Sunday School teacher reading a story about the Protestant Reformer Martin Luther.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 1800, ƒ/4, 1/100]
Next I need to go a little tighter in the photo.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 3200, ƒ/4, 1/100]
Then I am right back out shooting wide again.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 4500, ƒ/4, 1/100]
I like working around three to five feet of the people I am photographing. Sometimes I might get a little closer or I have something in between me and the subject that backs me up a little further.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 1800, ƒ/4, 1/100]
With this lady in the Sunday School class I am on the other side of the table. But I could get a little closer by zooming.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 3200, ƒ/4, 1/100]
Here the lady is in between me and this lady smiling. But I could isolate her and make you the audience look where I want you to look.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 2200, ƒ/4, 1/100]
Next I turn and get some shots of the teacher. You cannot run everywhere on a photo shoot without becoming the focus of everyone. That is what happens often when I have just a couple of fixed lenses. I might have a 85mm ƒ/1.8 on one camera and then the 35mm ƒ/1.4 on the other camera, but with the zoom I can get much better compositions without moving so much I become a distraction.

[Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4, ISO 3200, ƒ/4, 1/100–Godox V860IIN]
Very rarely do I ever use on camera flash, but I had no assistant and setting up a light stand would have been knocked over with so many people. The people were backlit and were pretty much a silhouette. I just filled in using the Godox V860IIN with MagMod sphere to soften and spread the light. I used slow sync and was able with the Sigma 24-105mm ƒ/4 Art lens capture this moment.

My goal was to give the client a variety. You cannot do that with one lens as easily as mixing up the looks with a few lenses.

Hope these insights help you on your next photo shoot.

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