Shooting Nikon D5 at an event with ISOs of 66535, 51200, 28800 etc

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, Neewer TT850, Neewer Wireless 16 Channel Remote, ISO 51200, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

This week I was shooting for the first time at high ISO numbers that I would have never used before for an event.

The event was in a restaurant/bar where the lighting was quite dark. The lights were spot lights from above which meant many times the subjects faces were inadequately lighted. Once I used a flash to correct the background went extremely dark.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, Neewer TT850, Neewer Wireless 16 Channel Remote, ISO 66535, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

There were windows but that meant an even greater problem that only a flash could solve. So my assistant is holding a flash off to the side and I am triggering it wirelessly.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, Neewer TT850, Neewer Wireless 16 Channel Remote, ISO 28800, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

Here are the camera settings for the Nikon D5

  • Aperture priority [ƒ/4 or ƒ/5.6]
  • Auto ISO
    • 100 – 102400
    • 1/100
Now when I was using the Neewer TT850 flash it was too bright even at 1/128th power. To fix this I was using the MagMod light modifier system. I put two Neutral Density Gels over the flash to just wink a light in when I was shooting at those extreme high ISOs.
While it took me a couple minutes to figure out this system having done something similar in the past with lower ISO settings was helpful.
As you turn the ISO up your flash needs very little power to do the job. Just remember this if you try something similar.
Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, Neewer TT850, Neewer Wireless 16 Channel Remote, ISO 66535, ƒ/5.6, 1/100
The Nikon D5 is more than just a sports camera. It is a camera for every situation. 
Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, Neewer TT850, Neewer Wireless 16 Channel Remote, ISO 66535, ƒ/5.6, 1/100
I am thrilled with the quality of the high ISO of the Nikon D5. I now can do things not possible before with my Nikon D4.

Are your stories or visuals just flat?

Fujifilm X-E2, Fuji XF 55-200mm, ISO 3200, ƒ/3.9, 1/70

Do your stories/photos just seem flat to you? I know many times after I have worked so hard on a story/photo I just feel like the results just were not capturing something, but what was I missing?

Now when I cover sports, which is really a short story, where the winning team must overcome obstacles, to win I can see the problem with a flat coverage. The teams just never really put forth the effort that visually showed greatness.

Nikon D4, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 12800, ƒ/5.6, 1/2000

I have been having wonderful emails sent to me over the past couple weeks about my daughter’s performance as the witch in the musical Into the Woods. Now while I would be proud of her no matter what as her dad, I was really proud of her as an artist.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 9000, ƒ/5.6, 1/400

Some of those emails started to capture the nuance that she was able to deliver in her performance. One person wrote that my daughter was “making the part your own, not a stereotype or a copy of another actor’s work, but an artful blending of jagged, mean, ugly, playful, quirky, needy, and finally, channeling the almighty in condemning flawed mankind to tend the garden alone.  Your character arc was spot on.”

So exactly what is a character arc? It is the transformation or inner journey of a character over the course of the story. While many things may happen to a character in a theater performance, unless those are portrayed in someway on the stage the audience isn’t allowed to experience those changes.

This is what I would like to say is often the missing secret ingredient to a compelling story.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 1250, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

When I work often with a NGO in telling their story I must interview a person about the before the climax of the story. I am most often telling a success story which means I have missed the opportunity to show this main character struggling.

What I can do and often do is have them tell me about what it was like before. I want them to articulate the struggle they experienced. After hearing this part of the interview I then can go and get b-roll of others also going through this. I should be able to find this because most NGOs are raising funds to help others like their success story.

Nikon D3s, AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR, ISO 2200, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

The main plot for most of these stories I am doing is that the main character is unable to overcome opposing forces, because they lack the skills, knowledge, resources or friends.

My audience is who I am appealing to be the ones who help with supplying the skills, knowledge, resources and being the friend to help other like this person to overcome their obstacles. It is imperative that I have done a good job of articulating why they cannot do it alone.

The last part of the story is showing the changes in the main subject. Today for example because of the changes they have gone through now their children can go to college and have a better life than the main subject.

The story is often flat because I have done a poor job of capturing the struggle and problems of the main character.

Don’t be the storyteller who only searches for those who take little effort on you to communicate their struggle. This is where you search for only stories that are often cliché. You find a person with major physical deformities to help you capture the struggle so you don’t have to work at it as hard.

Remember, everyone has a story, if we take the time to get to know them!

Nikon D5 Sports Photos @ 1:1

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 360, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

While I talked about covering the Lacrosse game I really didn’t show you the files very well. This is a full frame from the coverage.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 360, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

This is close to a 1:1 crop of the above photograph.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 640, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

This is another photo from the game. This is also a full framed image.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 640, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

Again this is a 1:1 crop as close as I could approximate.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 2000, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000 [Click to see full size]
You can click on this photo and see the full size image. Now this is ISO 2000. 
Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 2800, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000 [click to see larger file]
Here is one more for you to analyze. I love now shooting at 1/4000 to help freeze the ball. 
Now to shoot with a camera for just a couple weeks is still not enough for me. I have yet to shoot video with it and can’t wait for those projects as well to test the 4K. Stay tuned.

Testing the Nikon D5 on College Lacrosse

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 400, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

The past two days I shot two Lacrosse games. The Citadel was playing in the SELC Southwest Division tournament.

I was trying different settings with the camera and still haven’t settled on all my settings.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 320, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

I tried the 3D focusing on normal and then wide. Due to the players running around the goal and therefore having people in front and behind the subject it was hard to stay focused with this setting. Now I also didn’t modify the long versus short delay on continuous focus.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 2000, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

The camera was staying on the player I focused on with 3D it was just I might have them covered up by so many for pretty long time for sports.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 900, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

No question the Nikon D5 was locking in faster, shooting so much faster frame rate and giving me superior results over the Nikon D4. Yes it is a real upgrade for a sports camera.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 720, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

I think there are two sports which I am so comfortable shooting that when I am shooting those sports I will know even more. However, basketball and football are not in season. I did shoot some baseball at the Citadel earlier with the camera, but I don’t think this is quite the same challenge as Lacrosse where the focus would be a major factor.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 640, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

I do think that the dynamic range is also better than the Nikon D4. It is holding together highlight to shadows on a bright sunny day. That is a wide ƒ–stop range for sure.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 800, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

I am looking forward to shooting more sports in the coming months to really test the camera’s capabilities.

One more thing that I did notice is the buffer is huge. I never once had the camera slow down the next faster XQD cards and the camera’s processor let me shoot 12 fps with never having to wait on the camera.

I also shot about 30% more than I would normally shoot due to how quick the camera was handling.

To see more images go here to gallery I have on line http://www.stanleylearystoryteller.com/gallery/Citadel-Lacrosse/G0000RauPQOuPQGM

How to give light to the darkness with volunteers working with NGOs

Nikon D5, AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, ISO 400, ƒ/8, 1/100–Neewer TT850, Neewer 433MHz Wireless 16 Channel transmitter [Exposure Bias: -4/6 EV]

This morning I was shooting volunteers that were pulling nails out of 2’x4’s. We started early because is was actually sprinkling and a down pour was on it’s way. This was a nasty overcast day.

Now when people bend over and have on ball caps well this is the worst possible situation I can think of shooting where the natural light is actually working against you.

This morning I avoided getting this type of photo that I had at a football game. See how you cannot see their faces. The light is from above and when they are facing down you have total black under those helmets just like you have under the visor of a baseball cap.

My assistant took one of the Neewer TT850 flashes and I had the transmitter which controls the power on my camera. Sometimes I was at 1/8 power and other times only needed about 1/64 power to fill in those shadows of the people working.

My camera is pretty much on the ground so I can see their faces and so is the flash. I asked the assistant to try and stay 45º to 90º from me to create a triangle. I am one corner the subject is another and the flash is the 3rd corner of the triangle.

I am also slightly under exposing from 1/3 to 2/3 and even up to -1 stop under. The flash is kicking in and becomes the main light on the faces.

Nikon D5, AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, ISO 180, ƒ/8, 1/100–Neewer TT850, Neewer 433MHz Wireless 16 Channel transmitter [Exposure Bias: -4/6 EV]

Had I used on camera flash I would have gotten much better results than without a flash, but by getting the flash off the camera I create more modeling of the skin and creating depth.

Just remember to always have a flash in case you need to do something similar to help the audience connect with the subject.

PR Case Study with Musical Into the Woods

Great News!!

The PR effort my wife and a few other parents put into the musical Into the Woods helped to sell more tickets.

We put this poster up in front of the school and we had a family that had driven by the school come from Habersham County for the play. That is almost 2 hours one way for the play.

My parents were in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee and ran into people who were talking about the musical from just seeing the banner.

We made 8.5″ x 11″ postcards which had the photo on the front that could be displayed in area businesses and on the backside the rates for buying an ad in the program.

Nikon D4, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 2500, ƒ/6.3, 1/5000–HSS with Alienbees and Pocketwizard TTL system

When we shot the banner shot we also did individuals that we could then use in social media.

We kept this in front of our students and parents all the time and then did what we could to impact the community and our social media connections around the world.

Nikon D4, Nikon 85mm ƒ/1.8G, ISO 50, ƒ/4.5, 1/160

We did headshots of all the cast and crew which we then put in the program and in the lobby of the auditorium.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 14400, ƒ/5.6, 1/400

The production quality was going up in every way. I believe that as we brought our “A” Game it challenged everyone to do their very best.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 9000, ƒ/5.3, 1/400

The reviews were great for everything. Each night the word got out that this was a great show to see. I believed if they had done it the following weekend that the word getting out would have sold even more tickets.

Our ticket sales were 123% higher than our goal. I think the percentage jump of actual attendance over the previous year was a lot more than a 20% jump.

Time to take a bow

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 4500, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

Moral of this story

Marketing works and if it can work for this musical it can work for your business, nonprofit or event that you are involved in doing. Are you putting in your best effort to promote your project?

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 5000, ƒ/5.6, 1/400

Fuji X-E2 the camera system for Live Theater

Fujifilm X-E2, FUJINON XF 55-200mm, ISO 1600, ƒ/4.8, 1/100

For the last performance of Into The Woods I shot with my Fuji X-E2. I was shooting with the electronic shutter mode, so it was completely silent. I had also learned from earlier tests that I needed to shoot below 1/100 with this stage lighting to avoid blurring of the image.

Now this is a pretty tricky lighting, but I could tweak the image before I shot it. I was seeing the results I would be getting and in theater the lighting changes so much that this is a blessing to shoot with the mirrorless Fuji X-E2.

Fujifilm X-E2, FUJINON XF 55-200mm, ISO 1250, ƒ/4.2, 1/100

I dialed in the best white balance using the Kelvin settings. I knew from past custom white balance that the Kelvin was around 2900º K so I just dialed that in.

I had confirmation because I could see the results before shooting in the viewfinder.

Fujifilm X-E2, FUJINON XF 55-200mm, ISO 5000, ƒ/4.8, 1/100

Silence Your Phones & No Texting

During theater productions just texting will light up your face to everyone around you. To avoid this problem with the camera’s LCD I turned that off and just used the EVF and had it set to only work when my eye was at the viewfinder.

Now since I had done the latest firmware upgrade for the Fuji X-E2 I now had the electronic shutter which allows for me to shoot in total silence.

I also put a small piece of gaffer’s tape over the light that shows the files being written on the SD card.

I wanted to not draw any attention to me shooting the performance.

Fujifilm X-E2, FUJINON XF 55-200mm, ISO 5000, ƒ/4.8, 1/100

I am convinced that I can shoot this setup in any theater and also due to fully silent use this on movie sets in the future. There is no need to use a Blimp to put your DSLR in to remain silent.

The Fuji X-E2 is my go to camera for live theater.

Are you preserving your stories and the stories of your family?

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 9000, ƒ/5.6, 1/400

Last night I enjoyed watching my daughter playing the witch in the musical Into the Woods at her high school.

It made me think of thirty-four years earlier my high school musical Lil’ Abner. 


This is one of two photos I have of me from that performance. I gave my camera to a friend and asked them to take some photos. They took maybe three photos total. When shooting film people were careful because each time you pushed the button it was like spending a dollar.

This is just a copy of the print from that show that I could find.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 5000, ƒ/5.6, 1/125

The main characters in the musical Into the Woods are taken from Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and Cinderella, as well as several others. The musical is tied together by an original story involving a childless baker and his wife and their quest to begin a family, their interaction with a witch who has placed a curse on them, and their interaction with other storybook characters during their journey.

It makes you think about the next generation. As I am watching this I am realizing I am now watching the next generation as actors on the stage as my friends and I did years ago. Some of my friends went on to Broadway from that cast and there maybe some from the cast today that will become Broadway stars.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 7200, ƒ/4, 1/80

My daughter has all of our family flying in from all over the country to see her as the Witch. I hope that in thirty-four years that all these photos and videos I have been making of my daughter will help her tell her story to her children.

What I hope to do with my photos of our family is to help preserve the story of our family so that in the generations to come will be able to look back and see the legacy from which they come from.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-1401 2x, ISO 7200, ƒ/4, 1/400

What are you doing to help preserve your families story? Are you capturing some of the moments that can be shared in the future?

Thank goodness that today’s cameras let us capture situations that when I was in high school were so difficult to capture on film.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-1401 2x, ISO 7200, ƒ/4, 1/400

Tips

  • Take the photos of live performances and events of your family
  • Share the photos now through social media
  • Store images – have the images in at least three places. With today’s Cloud solutions I recommend putting the photos here as one way to preserve them.
  • Create hard copies
    • Prints
    • Photo Books
  • Include Text!!!!! Take the time to write down things like who is in the picture and what is going on. Think of writing a caption like you would see in a newspaper or magazine. Attach it to the photo. [metadata]
  • Have a plan on how you will pass down to future generations your photos for them to have and cherish.

Nikon D5 shooting Theater

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 4000, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

There are certain types of lighting situations where the latest and greatest camera will not make all that much difference.

Whenever the ISO is around 3200 I believe the differences are not as noticeable at first glance as when your ISO is say at ISO 16000 for example.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 16000, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

Now there are some moments like this where the stage during the theater performance was dark and the ISO 16000 does give me a very clean file.

If you shoot a lot of stage performances then you know sometimes the lighting isn’t all that great. A lighting tech forgets a lighting cue and the light isn’t correct, but you still need a photo. Hey the Nikon D5 will now let you get those moments.

Now if you are shooting studio strobes like these headshots then there is minimal difference.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 100, ƒ/5, 1/200

The headshot here is really a great file, but so was the Nikon D4 file earlier I shot.

Nikon D4, Nikon 85mm ƒ/1.8G, ISO 100, ƒ/5, 1/200

By the way the Nikon D5 was shot after the actor went to the beach last week.

If you are in situations where you have good light then if you will not necessarily see a big difference in the camera upgrade.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 1100, ƒ/5.6, 1/100

I shot this photo on the Flat Picture Control setting. I think the dynamic range is much better over earlier Nikon models. Shooting a dress rehearsal let me have some pretty extreme situations because the lighting wasn’t set for the witch to make her as visible from the audience as Rapunzel in the tower. So you can see that is quite a range.

Now I can say that the results using the Highlight-weighted metering mode as compared to the Nikon D750 isn’t giving me the same results.

Nikon D5, AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR, ISO 2800, ƒ/4, 1/400

In this situation where there was a lot of black the Nikon D5 Highlight-weighted metering mode worked great. But in unless the frame is mainly black with a spotlight the exposures were way underexposed.

I think I trust the Nikon D750 Highlight-weighted metering mode more than the Nikon D5 at this moment. However, let me say that this is just preliminary comment. I do believe every new camera takes a little while to really run it through all the situations many times before I can rule out my own errors using the new tool.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 9000, ƒ/5.6, 1/400

Conclusion

Unless you need those higher ISOs then in general you will not benefit from the Nikon D5 say over the Nikon D4. As you can see for theater, you will see a noticeable difference.

If you are primarily a studio shooter, then I personally haven’t seen any major differences except when it came to resolution. Higher resolution will let you make bigger prints and as we know you can sell a bigger print for a lot more money.

Nikon D5, AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR, ISO 9000, ƒ/5.3, 1/400

Now I included this last photo to really point out how much backgrounds can impact a photo. The first night I shot the dress rehearsal they didn’t have the woods background. I think the background really made a HUGE difference and helped to take the level of production of the musical to a different level visually.

Just like in real estate LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION makes a big difference. For photography it is often the same thing, but we say it this way: BACKGROUND, BACKGROUND, BACKGROUND.

Independent Photographers Anxiety and How I deal with it

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 100, ƒ/4, 1/800

Just this past Friday the Knobs of The Citadel, also known as freshman, were having to walk the gutter to and from class.

Nikon D5, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 100, ƒ/4, 1/500

Only the upper class could use the sidewalks. It is part of what they call the 4th Class System. Here is the official explanation below. However the very next day was Recognition Day where after a grueling events the system is announced as over.

THE CITADEL’S FOURTH CLASS SYSTEM

The purpose of The Citadel’s Fourth Class system is to develop and graduate the “whole person.”

The Fourth Class System hinges on the completeness with which it matures, refines, trains, and schools the totality of a young cadet’s character. This finely balanced process provides the foundation of the “whole person” concept. During their four years as part of the Corps, cadets will develop academically, physically, militarily, and spiritually.

Anxiety is an Altered State of Consciousness

Each day our brain is thinking and processing our thoughts. We know the difference between our thoughts and actions, however anxiety changes all that for us.

Normal thoughts take into account things that could happen when we make certain choices. We understand life has some risks and make those choices where we diminish the possibility of terrible consequences. Anxious Thinking cannot accept any risks. It continually asks for reassurances, and it demands that we avoid situations that frighten us. Anxious Thinking makes no distinction between feeling frightened because of catastrophic images in our mind, and the fear of being in actual danger.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 1000, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

Many of the Knobs have trouble sleeping Friday night because they know that the next day is Recognition Day. This is where for the very last time they will be pushed physically and mentally by the upper class.

As I walked around the campus I could hear upperclassmen, parents and friends reassuring the Knobs to not over think it and just leave their best effort on the field.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 2000, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

I’ll Admit It–I Get Anxious

When things happen to me that I have no control over it is very common for me to get caught in anxious thoughts. While I haven’t had a major melt down with an anxiety attack like some people, I can tell you I fully understand how that can happen.

While just about anything can trigger these anxious thoughts it is when I have a few things that happen to me in a row that my ability to manage these anxious thoughts becomes increasingly difficult.

Recently we have experienced a series of medical expenses. We also had to replace a transmission in our van. Also while it is good news you have to pay more in taxes [means you made more money] it can produce more anxiety.

Over the years I have been able to understand that one of my fears is having to go into debt to cover unexpected expenses. Another real fear with medical procedures is they usually involve some pain in recovery.

If you find yourself shutting down and avoiding situations because of the fear you have, then I highly recommend seeing a counselor and/or psychiatrist who can help you manage these anxiety attacks.

Nikon D4, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 800, ƒ/8, 1/2000

After breakfast the cadets all changed into their workout clothes. I then saw all of them running out of the barracks onto the parade field where they would be challenged and tested.

While many of them had trouble sleeping the night before, they embraced the fears and knew they would just do their best in the moment.

Nikon D5, Sigma 120-300mm ƒ/2.8 DG OS HSM | S, Sigma TC-2001 2x, ISO 900, ƒ/5.6, 1/4000

What was surprising to me was watching many of the cadets smiling and having fun. I think they were the ones who were able to dismiss the thoughts of what could happen and just deal with what is happening.

Call it Anxiety

One of the best things you can do is to realize when you are feeling overwhelmed and anxious that these fears affect you the same way as if you really were in true danger. This makes it extremely difficult for you to think clearly.

Call it what it is as Anxiety. By you naming it then you have better chance of dealing with it. Then just deal with the facts. I had to really think out what was the worst thing that could happen.

Now to be honest logic alone doesn’t work for me. I had to use my faith to help me. I meditate on these scriptures many times in times of anxiety.

Philippians 4:6-7 

6 Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. 7 And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

John 14:27

27 Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.

Now I just don’t jump straight to prayer and giving this all to God. I always first experience some anxiety. I think about what I am feeling and try to understand the emotion and pray for wisdom.

I need wisdom for me to think through what is causing anxiety and to get to the root. This also helps me to know if there is anything I can do other than avoidance of the situation. I want to be proactive if there is something I can do, but I also am asking for the wisdom to know the difference as to what I can do and what I have no control over.

Nikon D4, Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM Art Lens, ISO 100, ƒ/8, 1/250

After that morning the 4th Class System was announced that it was no longer in effect. The Knobs now joined the upperclassmen as fully integrated into the corp.

The marchers depart from The Citadel’s main gate, down Moultrie St. and then turning right on King St. to Marion Square. The cadets take the oath – which has been carried out in some fashion for more than 100 years. 

Worrying is carrying tomorrow’s load with today’s strength- carrying two days at once. It is moving into tomorrow ahead of time. Worrying doesn’t empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength. – Corrie ten Boom